Last edited by Arashizilkree
Friday, July 10, 2020 | History

2 edition of The impulse society found in the catalog.

The impulse society

Paul Roberts

The impulse society

America in the age of instant gratification

by Paul Roberts

  • 301 Want to read
  • 21 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Social conditions,
  • Economic history,
  • Civilization,
  • Economic conditions,
  • Social history

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (pages 269-298) and index.

    StatementPaul Roberts
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHC106.84 .R63 2014
    The Physical Object
    Paginationx, 308 pages
    Number of Pages308
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL26888977M
    ISBN 101608198146
    ISBN 109781608198146
    LC Control Number2014004614
    OCLC/WorldCa849212204

    Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The Impulse Society: America in the Age of Instant Gratification by Paul Roberts (, Hardcover) at the best online prices at eBay! Free shipping for many products!   More than thirty years ago, Christopher Lasch hinted at this bleak world in his landmark book, The Culture of Narcissism. In The Impulse Society, Roberts shows how that self-destructive pattern has grown so pervasive that anxiety and emptiness are becoming embedded in our national character. Yet it is in this unease that Roberts finds clear.

    Book reviews. The Impulse Society Paul Roberts Review by Edward Morris. September Global and ravenous, modern capitalism has turned American citizens into mere consumers, people who are focused principally on their own gratification and essentially indifferent to the needs of the larger society. More than thirty years ago, Christopher Lasch hinted at this bleak world in his landmark book, The Culture of Narcissism. In The Impulse Society, Roberts shows how that self-destructive pattern has grown so pervasive that anxiety and emptiness are becoming embedded in our national character. Yet it is in this unease that Roberts finds clear.

      “The Impulse Society,” published by Bloomsbury USA, is a feisty read and full of energy. The problem is the attempt to produce a grand theory to explain a set of crucial issues facing the U.S. Paul Roberts is a journalist and author of the books The End of Oil and The End of Food. His most recent is The Impulse Society. About The Impulse Society.


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The impulse society by Paul Roberts Download PDF EPUB FB2

"The Impulse Society: America in the Age of Instant Gratification" is a complicated and massive subject. Paul does a wonderful job in bringing the independent variables into play, showing how its connected resulting in a trend of instant gratification.

There are so many insights in this by: 5. Paul Roberts labels this narcissism, and the related self-absorption, self-centeredness and self-indulgence as the "Impulse Society", and explores in his book of this title how our society has become hyper-impulsive, with individuals demanding instant self-gratification regardless of the consequences and impact/5.

“The Impulse Society is a book that taps into a sense that we're all adrift -- and finds that technological, economic, and social change has caused us to lose the community that had anchored us. A society that tries to give (and sell) each of us everything we want, Roberts writes, is a society nobody wants/5(46).

“The Impulse Society is a book that taps into a sense that we're all adrift -- and finds that technological, economic, and social change has caused us to lose the community that had anchored us.

A society that tries to give (and sell) each of us everything we want, Roberts writes, is a society. “ The Impulse Society is a book that taps into a sense that we're all adrift — and finds that technological, economic, and social change has caused us to lose the community that had anchored us.

A society that tries to give (and sell) each of us everything we want, Roberts writes, is a society Brand: Bloomsbury USA. The Impulse Society is The impulse society book eye-opening analysis of how society has radically changed as we retreat from tight-knit communities behind the closed doors of our own personal worlds.

This book not only reveals the social, economic and political manifestations of a world based solely on self-interest, but also suggests what we need to do to pull our lives and communities back together again.

“The Impulse Society is a book that taps into a sense that we're all adrift -- and finds that technological, economic, and social change has caused us to lose the community that had anchored us.

A society that tries to give (and sell) each of us everything we want, Roberts writes, is a society nobody wants. A book that pegs contemporary American society and politics for what they are: species of infantile disorder, demanding attention (and sweets) now.

"The Impulse Society" is a book that taps into a sense that we're all adrift -- and finds that technological, economic, and social change has caused us to lose the community that had anchored us.

A society that tries to give (and sell) each of us everything we want, Roberts writes, is a /5(). - The Impulse Society, page In earlier chapters, Roberts explores how manufacturing and finance changed, making Americans more mobile than ever before.

This mobility provided the opportunities to move to cities, counties, and neighborhoods among like-minded people with similar lifestyles. “The Impulse Society” sounds a memorable alarm with its record of disturbing facts and trends, but it leaves us uncertain what path we should follow.

And yet, even as our dilemma grows, The Impulse Society finds hopeful signs-not least, a revolt among everyday Americans against the forces of an unchecked market. Inspired by their example, Roberts outlines a way back to a world of real and lasting good.

Read Full Product DescriptionBrand: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC. "The Impulse Society is a book that taps into a sense that we're all adrift - and finds that technological, economic, and social change has caused us to lose the community that had anchored us.

A society that tries to give (and sell) each of us everything we want, Roberts writes, is a society nobody wants.". The modern consumer society caters to personalized choices in food, cars, news and exercise programs.

Excess choice, self-gratification and self-centeredness diminish tolerance for others. The “Impulse Society” increases social conflict, and undermines national culture and democracy.8/10().

More than thirty years ago, Christopher Lasch hinted at this bleak world in his landmark book, The Culture of Narcissism. In The Impulse Society, Roberts shows how that self-destructive pattern has grown so pervasive that anxiety and emptiness are becoming embedded in our national character.

Yet it is in this unease that Roberts finds clear signs of change—and a broad revolt as millions of Americans try. I started Impulse with really high hopes for this after enjoying Hopkins' Tricks series.

Unfortunately, Impulse is a pretty terrible book, with severe issues of mental health being tackled sort of horribly and a shitty love triangle no one cares about. And besides that, it contains the most homophobic storyline I have ever had the displeasure of reading/5.

But the reigning "Impulse Society," as Roberts calls it, has returned with a reverence for unapologetic materialism which is "juiced up by technology, globalization, a more mercenary business model, and a less engaged government." Today's emphasis in consumerism is on speed (same-day delivery) and superabundance (all-you-can-eat).

Paul Roberts is the author of three books — The Impulse Society: America in the Age of Instant Gratification; The End of Food (); and The End of Oil: On the Edge of a Perilous New World (). A journalist sinceRoberts has also written for The Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, and The (UK) Guardian and his work has appeared in Slate, USA Today, The New Republic, Newsweek.

Paul Roberts' galvanizing, sweeping social critique of our Impulse Society is now available in paperback. More timely than ever, the book confronts a world where business shamelessly seeks the fastest reward, regardless of the long-term social costs; where political leaders reflexively choose short-term fixes over broad, sustainable social progress; where individuals feel increasingly /5().

Book: The Impulse Society Sunday, Septem Paul Roberts argues that unfettered corporations and technology have revised the worker-capital relationship and the.

The Impulse Society is a feisty read and full of energy It is hard not to empathise with his yearning for simpler times; when communities were "willing to make sacrifices for a larger social good" * Financial Times * A stunning piece of work - perhaps the best single book ever produced about our energy economy and its environmental.The Impulse Society: America in the Age of Instant Gratification () InRoberts published his third book, titled The Impulse Society: America in the Age of Instant Gratification.

The book was was described by Elizabeth Gilbert as “tracing the country's many, disparate ills to the same source: as a nation, we've abandoned the common.Paul Robert's “The Impulse Society” is one of the most interesting and intellectually satisfying non-fiction books I have engaged in the last year.

Roberts begins with the premise that modern day American society is built on the need for immediate gratification from our consumer behaviors, social interactions, business practices, and political preferences.